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COURSE NUMBER: THEO 369
COURSE TITLE: Saving God? Contemporary Theology
NAME OF INSTRUCTOR: Michael Buttrey
CREDIT WEIGHT AND WEEKLY TIME DISTRIBUTION: credits 3(hrs lect 3 - hrs sem 0 - hrs lab 0)
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will present historical background to and engagement with selected themes and theologians of importance in contemporary Christian discussion, with special emphasis on North American theology. Topics may include feminist theology; evangelicalism, post-liberalism, and post-modernism; and current trinitarian theology, represented by contemporary theologians. This course does not fulfill theology foundations requirements.

Prerequisites: THEO 250
 
REQUIRED TEXTS: David Ford, Mike Higton, eds. The Modern Theologians Reader. Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell, 2012.
MARK DISTRIBUTION IN PERCENT:
Attendance and Participation10%
Reading Responses45%
Review Essay and Presentation25%
Final Exam20%
100%
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
  1. To spark interest in the work of theology.
  2. To introduce you to prominent figures, topics, and trends in contemporary theology.
  3. To develop your ability to articulate your own theological arguments and questions in conversation with your colleagues and the work of contemporary theologians.
LECTURE OUTLINE:
  • Introductions
    • 1 September 5 Syllabus and Guidelines
    • 2 September 7 Acts 13 and 17, 1st Corinthians 1 (The Bible); Introduction (Reader)
    • 3 September 12 Garrett Green, "Modernity" (17 pages)
    • 4 September 14* Schleiermacher
  • Scripture
    • 5 September 19* 1.1 Karl Barth; 16.1 Rudolf Bultmann (12 pages total)
    • September 21 IS Conference, no class
    • 6 September 26 33.1 J.I. Packer; 4.2 Henri de Lubac (13 pages)
  • 7 September 28* 29.1 Fernando F. Segovia; 29.2 Musa W. Dube (11 pages)
  • Christ
    • 8 October 3 6.1 Hans Urs von Balthasar; 30.1 Joint Declaration (10 pages)
    • 9 October 5* 1.2 Karl Barth; 2.2 Dietrich Bonhoeffer (14 pages)
    • 10 October 10 25.2 Elsa Tamez; Kathryn Tanner, “Justification and Justice” (13 pages)
  • Method
    • 11 October 12* 17.2 Alvin Plantinga; 18.2 Jean-Luc Marion (14 pages)
    • 12 October 17 19.1 John Polkinghorne; 19.2 Nancey Murphy (9 pages)
    • 13 October 19* 13.1 George Lindbeck; 13.2 Hans Frei (10 pages)
  • Church
    • 14 October 24 11.2 Reinhold Niebuhr; 10.2 Rowan Williams (11 pages)
    • 15 October 26* 24.1 Gayraud S. Wilmore; 26.2 Mercy Abma Oduyoye (11 pages)
    • 16 October 31 20.1 Ernst Troeltsch; 20.2 John Milbank (13 pages)
  • Trinity
    • 17 November 2* 8.2 Jurgen Moltmann; 6.2 Hans Urs von Balthasar (12 pages)
    • 18 November 7* Elizabeth Johnson, "Female Symbols"; Karen Kilby, “Perichoresis and Projection” (17 pages)
    • November 9 Fall term break, no class
    • 19 November 14 23.2 Janet Martin Soskice; Sarah Coakley, “Recasting” (16 pages)
  • Presentations
    • 20 November 16* Readings to be determined
    • 21 November 21 Student presentations
    • 22 November 23 Student presentations
    • 23 November 28 Student presentations
    • 24 November 30 Student presentations or readings to be determined (depending on class size)
  • Wrap-up
    • 25 December 5* Readings to be determined depending on class interests
    • 26 December 7 14.2 Robert Jenson (7 pages) 


Required texts, assignments, and grade distributions may vary from one offering of this course to the next. Please consult the course instructor for up to date details.

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