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COURSE NUMBER: PHIL 347
COURSE TITLE: Late European Modern Philosophy
NAME OF INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Jeffrey Dudiak
CREDIT WEIGHT AND WEEKLY TIME DISTRIBUTION: credits 3(hrs lect 3 - hrs sem 0 - hrs lab 0)
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is an attempt to lead students into an understanding and critical engagement of the central 19th Century debate among  European  philosophers  between  the  idealists (represented most importantly by G.W.F. Hegel) who advocated an understanding of the world as a rational system, and their critics (of whom S. Kierkegaard is the most vivid example) who, in the name of an otherwise lost individuality, advocated an "irrational," personal basis for understanding and life. This course will engage this philosophical issue and period with an eye  toward  the  ongoing  implications  of  the  debate  for philosophy, but also for theology, and for the human sciences.

Prerequisites: PHIL 230
REQUIRED TEXTS:
  • G.W.F. Hegel, Introduction to the Philosophy of History (Hackett, 1988).
  • Soren Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling (any edition)
MARK DISTRIBUTION IN PERCENT:
Midterm exam 20%
Final exam20%
Weekly critical questions20%
Term paper20%
Course presentations10%
Class presentations/participation 10%
100%
COURSE OBJECTIVES: In this course we will explore the themes of late modern philosophy with a focus on the thought of Kierkegaard, one if its most vivid voices, and one of its most penetrating critics.  Along the way we will:
  • develop strategies for effectively reading philosophical texts
  • learn and critically engage the basic theories of Hegel and Kierkegaard across a focussed reading of course texts
  • develop a philosophical vocabulary
  • meaningfully reflect upon Hegel’s and Kierkegaard’s views on history, system, and God, and their significance for our lives and faith
COURSE OUTLINE: Hegel, about 5 weeks; Kierkegaard, about 5 weeks, followed by term paper presentations.  


Required texts, assignments, and grade distributions may vary from one offering of this course to the next. Please consult the course instructor for up to date details.

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