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COURSE NUMBER: PHIL 332
COURSE TITLE: 20th Century Continental Philosophy
NAME OF INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Jeff Dudiak
CREDIT WEIGHT AND WEEKLY TIME DISTRIBUTION: credits 3 (hrs lect 3 - hrs sem 0 - hrs lab 0)
COURSE DESCRIPTION: An examination of some recent figures and movements in continental philosophy. Attention is given to philosophers such as Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Gadamer, Ricouer, Adorno, Habermas, Foucault and Derrida as well as to movements such as phenomenology, existentialism, philosophical hermeneutics, neo-Marxism, structuralism and post-structuralism. Attempts are made to discover historical connections not only among various philosophies but also between those philosophies and selected developments in the arts, the sciences and European society.

Prerequisites: PHIL 230
REQUIRED TEXTS: John D. Caputo, Radical Hermeneutics: Repetition, Deconstuction, and the Hermeneutic Project, Bloomington & Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1987.
MARK DISTRIBUTION IN PERCENT:
Midterm exam 20%
Term paper 30%
Final exam20%
Weekly questions20%
Participation10%
100%
COURSE OBJECTIVES: This course will serve as an introduction to some of the major themes of contemporary continental thought, and an invitation to students to engage this movement in their thinking of science, ethics/politics, and religion.  Our goals will be to:
1. develop strategies for effectively reading philosophical texts
2. learn and critically engage the basic themes communicated in our text, and related texts
3. develop a philosophical vocabulary in the area of continental philosophy
4. meaningfully reflect upon the significance for our lives and faith of the way of thought introduced in the course
COURSE OUTLINE: Three classes will be spent on each of Caputo’s ten chapters, with the strategic insertion of extra materials at appropriate points.


Required texts, assignments, and grade distributions may vary from one offering of this course to the next. Please consult the course instructor for up to date details.

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